About your Search

20100901
20100930
SHOW
Today 27
( more )
STATION
FOXNEWS 152
MSNBC 104
CNN 81
KQED (PBS) 63
CSPAN 55
WHUT (Howard University Television) 41
KRCB (PBS) 40
WETA 40
SFGTV2 35
WJLA (ABC) 34
KGO (ABC) 33
KNTV (NBC) 32
WMPT (PBS) 31
KPIX (CBS) 29
WUSA (CBS) 29
WBAL (NBC) 27
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 992
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,005 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the caucus -- for the office of u.n. secretary general. can you give us an explanation of what you did at the u.n. as far as your role there? guest: i helped on the israeli- palestinian negotiations at the time and then i came back in 2004 and help to the then secretary general put together a series of reforms. he wanted a series of changes made to have the u.n. do business. i help him put that set of ideas on the table. host: you were quoted earlier this week. this is a little bit of what you said. you said, -- expand on that? guest: ike was saying, in the old debt -- in the old days of the u.n., they could push decisions through. the big factor in international politics right now is the rise of the new powers -- china, india, and brazil as well as south africa and turkey. they have greater influence in regional politics and a greater influence in global politics. it means the united states and europe needs to find new ways, new alliances, and strike up new relationships to get things done. that is only the beginning. i think this administration has done a good job in forging a new re
senior adviser for the caucus -- for the office of u.n. secretary general. can you give us an explanation of what you did at the u.n. as far as your role there? guest: i helped on the israeli- palestinian negotiations at the time and then i came back in 2004 and help to the then secretary general put together a series of reforms. he wanted a series of changes made to have the u.n. do business. i help him put that set of ideas on the table. host: you were quot earlier this week. this is a little bit of what you said. you said, -- expand on that? guest: ike was saying, in the old debt -- in the old days of the u.n., they could push decisions through. the big factor in international politics right now is the rise of the new powers -- china, india, and brazil as well as south africa and turkey. they have greater influence in regional politics and a greater inuence in global politics. it means the united states and europe needs to find new ways, new alliances, and strike up new relationships to get things done. that is only the beginning. i think this administration has done a good job in forg
of their comrades died. 10 years on, what progress is being made on meeting the u.n.'s millennium development goals as mothers still die in child birth and children go hungry? more controversy for international cricket amid another match fixing allegation. welcome to bbc world news, broadcast to you on pbs in america and also around the globe. coming up, showing off the latest wheels in gaza as israel allows new cars into the territory for the first time in three years. >> i don't believe it. oh, god, oh, thank you, thank you. >> a moment a bbc team saw the pictures that confirmed the existence of a lost population of tigers. hello and welcome to british soldiers in helman province in southern afghanistan has been one of the most dangerous places in the world. the past four years more than 100 british troops have died there, almost a third of all british losses in afghanistan. well, today the u.k. handed over responsibility for the area to the americans. commanders say progress has been made, but admit their work is unfinished. >> captain david patton, sergeant paul bartlett. private damian jackson
services. ♪ >> 140 heads of state and government have gathered in new york for a three-day u.n. summit on fighting poverty. u.n. secretary-general ban ki- moon told delegates on monday that the millennium development goals agreed on 10 years ago have transformed development efforts, producing more success stories than ever before. but he also pointed out that those advances are fragile and that more than 100 million people in the world still live on less than $2.25 per day. >> security is tight around un headquarters in new york. doesn't a political leaders from around the world joined the city. the main goal set by delegates 10 years ago was to halt poverty and hunger by 2015. in his opening address, the u.n. secretary general reported mixed progress. he said there is still much to be done in some areas like the fight against hunger, but he noted improvements in the provision of medical care for aids sufferers and an education. >> we must protect these advances, many of which is still fragile. and the clock is ticking. we have much more to do. >> the german chancellor will address del
, present, and future role of the u.n. and its relevancy in the post-9/11 world. this is 45 minutes. host: joining us from new york is bruce jones of the new york university. he is with the center of international corp. director and serve as a former senior adviser for the caucus -- for the office of u.n. secretary general. can you give us an elanation of what you did at the u.n. as far as your role there? guest: i helped on the israeli- palestinian negotiations at the time and then i came back in 2004 and help to the then secretary general put together a series of reforms. he wanted a series of changes made to have the u.n. do business. i help him put that set of ideas on the table. host: you were quoted earlier this week. this is a little bit of what you said. you said, -- expand on that? guest: ike was saying, in the old debt -- in the old days of the u.n., they could push decisions through. the big factor in international politics right now is the rise of the new powers -- china, india, and brazil as well as south africa and turkey. they have greater influence in regional politics and
it should have for the 2011 harvest. >> the u.n. holds a food summit in rome to calm fears in the world's poorest countries. >> welcome to gmt. also in the program -- the first woman to be executed in the united states for five years. teresa lewis is put to death. 50 days underground. the trapped miners in chile mark a milestone as the operation to get them out gathers momentum. >> it is midday in london and 1:00 p.m. in rome, where the united nations is holding an extraordinary summit after weeks of spiralling food prices. the origins of that spike lie in russia. after drought and wild fires, the russians proposed a ban in exports. now, a two-year high. it has prompted fears of hunger and unrest in some of the world's poorest countries. is there really a shortage, or are profiteers manipulating the market? >> first, there were those parched russian wheat fields. then, a climate emergencies elsewhere. some say this was due to hedge funds. either way, crop specialists tell us the yield swings are here to stay. >> the good news is that a global harvest has been pretty good this year. the
the korans. allegations of mass rape in the democratic republic of congo. the u.n. is accused of failing to protect hundreds of women and children. a huge bomb in northwestern pakistan kills at least 20. it is the second militant attack in as many days. and more than 1 million take to the streets against planned austerity measures dealing with french pension reform. welcome to bbc news. good to have you with us. we are broadcasting to our viewers in the united kingdom and around the world with me, james bagwell. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has spoken out against the plan to burn korans. general david petraeus said if it went ahead, images of the event would be used by insurgents to incite violence. coming up, we will hear what hillary clinton had to say with this report from washington. >> this is what worries general david petraeus is. 500 people in kabul, gather to demonstrate. one small church in america plans to bring copies of the koran. protesters threw rocks. >> we are concerned about the possible implications of a koran burning in the united states. it puts us in jeop
. >>> prime minister naoto kan will leave japan for new york on wednesday to attend the u.n. general assembly. he'll also hold talks with u.s. president barack obama. during his four-day visit to the united states, kan will attend a u.n. summit on the millennium development goals that aim to reduce poverty by half in developing countries by 2015. he'll meet the u.s. president at a new york hotel on thursday. this will be the second meeting between the two leaders. kan is expected to tell obama that the japanese government hopes to proceed with the relocation of the u.s. futenma air station in okinawa based on the agreement reached in may. the two countries agreed to relocate the futenma base to a coastal area of nago city, also in okinawa. kan and obama are likely to discuss further cooperation in the areas of economy, security, and assistance to developing countries. kan will deliver his first speech to the u.n. general assembly. he'll emphasize japan's active role in contributing to the international community. kan is also scheduled to meet u.n. secretary-general ban ki moon. >>> welcome ba
by the existing japan-u.s. security treaty. during talks on the sidelines of the u.n. general assembly thursday, maehara explained to clinton about the incident involving a chinese fishing boat and japan's coast guard vessels. the senkaku islands are under japanese control but are also claimed by china and taiwan. maehara says he told his counterpart that he'll try to solve the diplomatic problem from a comprehensive viewpoint because the islands are an integral part of japan. maehara says he conveyed his appreciation that the existing japan-u.s. security treaty covers the senkaku islands. he says clinton agreed that article 5 of the security pact would be applied in case of an armed conflict. maehara also said clinton hoped japan and china would solve the issue through dialogue as both countries are important for stability in the region. >> in the talks, maehara also referred to the relocation issue of u.s. futenma air station in okinawa. he told clinton he'll tackle the issue with respect to the bilateral agreement established in may to relocate the base within the same prefecture. >>> meanwh
is before the u.n. general assembly. >> there are also challenges that we share in common as leaders and as nations. we meet within an institution built from the rubble of war. designed to unite the world in pursuit of peace. and we meet within a city that for centuries has welcomed people from across the globe. demonstrating that individuals of every color, faith and station can come together to pursue opportunity. build a community. and live with the blessing of human liberty. outside the doors of this hall, the blocks and neighborhoods of this great city tell the story of a difficult decade. nine years ago, the destruction of the world trade center signaled a threat that respecked no boundary of dignity or decency. two years ago this month, a financial crisis on wall street devastated american families on main street. and these separate challenges have affected people around the globe. men and women and children have been murdered by extremists from casablanca to london to julalabod. the global economy suffered an enormous blow during the financial crisis, crippling markets and de
received a response and he said he has not and we discussed the comments about lend he gave at the u.n. yesterday. and our reaction to that. >> you wished americans well. but you have insulted millions and millions of americans by claiming that the u.s. government had a hand in 9/11. frankly, sir, how could you say such an insane and nutty thing? when you address your own president the same way? would they ever allow you to? >> in terms of that remark, those remarks? >> you did not probably read the full remark. >> what evidence do you have that the up is responsible for 9/11? >> you are not allowing me to respond. and you insult me, as well. >> do you believe the government had a hand in 9/11? >> i did not say, give an opinion of my own, i actually suggested that a fact finding group and mission be formed to look into the truth. >> do you want to pursue a nuclear bomb? >> i have said on numerous occasions that we do not want an atomic bomb. >> why should we believe you, you are violating four u.n. resolutions, you kicked out u.n. inspectors, why should the world believe anything you s
recently. but at least we are trying to improve. yes, in its first ever report to the u.n human rights council, the state department says some minorities are still victims of discrimination. and despite some progress, quote, work continues to meet our goal of ensuringy -- ensuring equality. no wonder we should apologize. speaking of, sylvester stallone doesn't like them. complete sentences. but also apologies. and on "o'reilly" he said as much responding to an assertion that his latest flick was exploiting patriotism to help box office sales. here he is talking about his scene in the movie. >> i think one of the key lines in there he goes, "we will kill this american disease" meaning the cia people that are down there. some people read that i was maybe puting a focal point on american intrusion into other countries. you know, we tend to over extend our boundaries. i don't believe that at all. >> you were just sitting there trying to write dialogue. >> handsome as ever, o'reilly i mean. for more we go to "red eye"'s chief u.n correspondent. >> a single father going back to college to do
there is concern the u.n. headquarters here in manhattan may also be at risk. scores of world leaders will be in town next week for the u.n.'s general assembly. but no, officials say the u.n. is ignoring their security recommendations. david lee miller with the news. is he live outside of u.n. headquarters on the east side of manhattan, hello, david lee. >> hi, shepard, you know, it's not quite the proverbial sitting duck but experts say the's new york headquarters is in desperate need of a security overhaul. just about everyone we talked with said that the security here must be beefed up. the problem, there is no con ken us is on how to do it. >> new york city officials including the mayor and police commissioner are worried about a possible terror attack at the u.n. despite a massive $1.8 billion renovation now underway, a spokesman for the city told fox, well, city officials declined to speak on camera. the former head of the nypd criminal intelligence section assess the build's risk. >> the greatest concern is going to be some type of vehicle bomb or truck bomb that would be broug
expanded it its enrichment program even after the u.n. imposed more sanctions in june. they expect iran of trying to develop nuclear weapons. it's called on the country to allow inspectors to view all nuclear facilities and interview relevant officials. iran's nuclear program will be discussed at an iae board meeting september thenth. the latest revelation is expected to lead to increased pressure on iran to stop its uranium enrichment activities. >>> with the u.s. midterm elections less than two months away campaigns started in earnest on labor day, monday. president barack obama was in the midwestern state of wisconsin to rally support for democratic party candidates running in the november congressional elections. all house of representatives seats and a third of the senate seats are up for grabs. in wisconsin obama unveiled a new economic stimulus package focusing on rebuilding railways and other infrastructure projects. it is a key state where democratic candidates are facing an uphill battle. >> i am going to keep fighting every single day, every single hour, every single minute t
at the annual meeting of the u.n. general assembly on the topic of mideast peace. they restarted serious talks three weeks ago. the prospects continue to be uncertain at best. our sound effect is mr. obama's argument for pressing on. >> if an agreement is not reached, palestinians will never know the pride and dignity that comes with their own state. israelis will never know the certainty and security that comes with sovereign and stable neighbors who are committed to co-existence. the hard realities of demography will take hold. more blood will be shed. this holy land will remain a symbol of our differences instead of common humanity. i refuse to accept that future. and we all have a choice to make. each of us must choose the path of peace. >>> we're all waiting to see what happens on sunday. that is the end of israel's self-imposed freeze on expanding jewish settlements in the west banks. palestinians have made it clear they will not continue to keep talking if israelis resume building. we'll stay on top of that for you. >>> she's got about eight hours left on earth. hear the voice of a cond
the -- to the u.n. general assembly that when it meets next year, it may be welcoming in an independent palestinian state. he urged the world to put aside cynicism. he also told -- told iran that nuclear diplomacy is still urgent. we have this report from new york. it contains flash photography. >> a parade arrival at the united nations. president obama was late for his speech. at the podium, the overriding concern -- the current, fragile peace negotiations and upgrade protection. >> it is time that we reached deep within ourselves. when we come back here next year, we will have an agreement that will lead to any member of the united nations. an independent, sovereign state of palestine living in peace with israel. a ripple of applause -- >> a ripple of applause. and also a concern, the danger of iran acquiring nuclear weapons. >> the door remains open to diplomacy, should iran choose to walk through it. the iranian government must demonstrate a clear commitment and confirm to the world the peaceful intent of its nuclear program. >> note that president ahmadinejad was in the hall to hea
have been raped anti-democratic republic of condo, in recent weeks. one senior u.n. official accused peacekeepers of failing the people. >> great survivors in a region overwhelmed by sexual violence. -- rape survivors in a region overwhelmed by sexual violence. almost 500 women and children were raised by a rebel soldiers, in an apparently orchestrated campaign. >> they were specifically attacked by a group of men, between two and six people typically. they were beaten and sexually assaulted in front of family members and children. >> but could it have been stopped? the united nations runs the greatest peacekeeping operation here. there were troops and in the area, 20 miles away. communications are often difficult, but on this occasion, the u.n. admits it should have done much more. >> the primary responsibility for protection of civilian supplies with the state's. clearly, we have also failed. our actions were not adequate, resulting in an acceptable -- unacceptable violence in the region. we must do better. >> the u.n. has 20,000 peacekeepers here, but they are up against an ever-c
of the united states spoke at the u.n. on the same day. it's a weird sort of coincidence that keeps happening over and over again. it may be the closest these two people may get to meeting face-to-fail. one thing that's for sure is we're getting a lot of noise voluntary manslaughtering out of the u.n. that both iran and the united states are actually ready to get back in to negotiating about iran's nuclear program. that's good news if it's true. >> we talked the other day about the pressure on iran now because of the military strategy and the way it's thumbing its nose at international investigators. the iran defense minister has blasted russia's decision not to sell the s-300 missiles to iran. here's what the president said about iran today. >> iran is the only partner that cannot demonstrate the peaceful intentions of its nuclear program. and those actions have consequences. through u.n. security council resolution 1929, we made it clear that international law is not an empty promise. >> you know, it seems like every year at the u.n. general assembly, we hear the speeches about iran's nucle
. it was a public charity set up to support the u.n.'s causes. and this week marked the tenth anniversary of the u.n.'s millennium development goals. it's basically a to-do list for all 192 member states all with a simple mission that starts with ending poverty. so how have they held up the deal on their end? here's more on that and more on ted turner joining me now. ted, first of all, welcome back to cnn. it's always a pleasure to have you around. >> it's nice to be here. >> ted, you committed yourself in a very significant way. you gave away, what was it, a 30-year fortune you committed at the time. a third of what was in your fortune to getting things on track with the u.n. because you felt that some people, some organizations like the united states, were not holding up their end. so you committed $1 billion to the united nations foundation. you founded this organization. what has it done so far? >> well, it's done a lot of good. most of that money has gone out to different programs that are endorsed by the u.n. and the united states has paid its dues pretty much ever since then. it's up to date.
ahmadinejad, has a speech at the u.n. at a meeting on nuclear policy. and a man has dinner with ahmadinejad last night joins us like. and box two: the pledge to america. how republicans say they will change washington if voters put them in power. and in box three, i chomping at bit, one of the suspects text messages sent hours before prosecutors say he and another robbed, raibd, and murdered three people in a home invasion. that's all to come unless breaking news changes everything on studio b but first from fox at 3:00, the president of the united states speaks directly to his counterparts from the nations of the world. president obama addressed the u.n. general assembly and the speech touched on the international financial crisis. then turned to strained relations between countries and leaders. that, of course, includes iran and its president mahmoud ahmadinejad who is expected at a nuclear test ban treaty meeting this hour and our president tried to convince president and their president to get serious about talks to scale back the nuclear program. >> the united states and the internati
>>> a u.n. visit for president obama. he'll lay out america's stand on the world financial crisis, terrorism and nuclear weapons. >>> the gop agenda. in their pledge to america, republicans call for repealing health care reform and blocking tax hikes for the wealthy. >> i am sorry for those failings. >>> and apology, the owner of the iowa egg factory tells congress, he's sorry -- now. this is the "cbs morning news" for thursday, september 23rd, 2010. good morning, everyone on a thursday. good to see you, i'm terrell brown for betty nguyen this morning. president obama takes the podium later on at the u.n. for his second address to the general assembly. randall pinkston is at the united nations with details. randall, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, terrell. how are you? yes, indeed, president obama will be here at the united nations in just a few hours. with problems at home and flagging poll numbers, the president's address at the u.n. sure to give him awn opportunity to focus on his foreign policy accomplishments and his vision for the future. president obama's ex
all the other delegates. susan rice, thank you so much. iran again challenging the u.n. watchdog saying it is operating illegally, has no right to crack down. he's also saying the u.n. sanctions are having no effect, the effect of an interview -- in one interview he says it was a spoiled kleenex. what is your best information on how to deal with iran and whether these sanctions are having any effect? because certainly in his public statements skand iran's behavio it doesn't seem to have stepped back. >> you wouldn't expect the leader of iran to come ask say the sanctions are killing me. but with all the evidence we've seen, these have proven to be the toughest set of sanctions. u.n. community has ever imposed on iran and they're having difficulty as well as having iran move ships to acquire access to banking. they came in three categories. first, that that we passed at the united nations securities council. then the european union came behind, as did japan and south korea, others, canada, and imposed an even more sweeping set of sanctions as did our own congress. so in three laye
was doing anything about it, the u.n. was doing nothing about it. the people from sierra leone appealed to britain and blair said "all right, we'll send the boyce." wind we smashed this gang and got rid of charles taylor. very good. president clinton didn't hang tough over kosovo. made an early speech saying that the next confrontation would have to be with saddam hussein, that was in 1999. repeatedly said "we can't coexist with totalitarian ideologies or regimes." and lost his career and his reputation on it, largely. >> rose: tony blair has just published his much-anticipated memoir, it is called a journey: my political life." we talked about that, the book, and the controversy that surrounds him in a conversation earlier today at his office here in london. first of all, congratulations on the book. >> thank you. >> rose: what did you hope to accomplish? >> i think to open people's minds to a world view i have that that may be a little unfashionable in certain respects but it's still something i believe in. i wanted to make it accessible. i wanted to make it a good read. i wanted it t
by u.n. officials urging everyone to take the u.n. very seriously. in the midst of all this, there was actually one genuine piece of drama, which underlines an important tension in international politics. the presidents of turkey and israel did not meet, despite some effort to do so. and their diplomatic relations remain at a standstill over the so-called flotilla incident. you recall what happened. on may 31s of this year, turkish ships sought to seek the siege of gaza by bringing them food and medicine and other supplies. the flotilla refused. israel did board the ships. a scuffle broke out and nine activists were killed. eight of them turks and one american. . since then turkey has demanded that israel apologize and pay damages. israel has refused. now, this is more than a diplomatic spat. turkey is the only muslim country in the middle east to have had very good working ties with israel, incoming a strong military-to-military relationship. this association has been a force for stability in the middle east. as turkey has been able to be an intermediary for countries like
at the u.n., this will. guess what? you're paying for it. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] every siness day, bank of america lends billions of dollars, to individuals, institutions, schools, organizations and businesses. ♪ working to set opportunity in motion. bank of america. working to set opportunity in motion. [ technician ] are you busy? management just sent over these new technical manuals. they need you to translate them into portuguese. by tomorrow. [ male announcer ] ducati knows it's better for xerox to manage their global publications. so they can focus on building amazing bikes. with xerox, you're ready for real business. ♪ we need to finish tho projections ♪ ♪ then output the final presentations ♪ ♪ sally, i'm gonna need 40 copies, obviously collated ♪ wht's going on? when we're crunched for time, brad combines office celebrations with official business. it's about efficiency. [ courier ] we can help. wh you ship with fedex, you can work rht up until the lastinute. it gives you re time to get stuff done. that's a great idea. ♪ i need tspeak with you privately ♪ ♪
obama prepares to meet israeli and palestinian leaders at the white house. the u.n. has raised the alarm over children caught in the floods in pakistan. chris morris traveled to a u.n. supported relief camp in southern pakistan. >> line into the flood zone, the head of the u.n. children's fund. how many children are suffering down there? when can they go back to school? at a relief camp on the ground, people are waiting patiently for supplies as visitors from the united nations arrived, a school that has and taken over by the emergency relief effort. >> from the himalayas to the sea, thousands of school buildings have been damaged or destroyed. even places that have survived have served as temporary relief camps. there are few places in the flood zone where the children can go to school. >> inside there is one room where the children can be themselves, playing games or drawing pictures about what they have just been through. >> this is my house, washed away by the flood, so we went to stay with my aunt. >> alongside these child families faces that help with the trauma, there is an urgent
of congo. a senior u.n. official has accused peacekeepers there of failing the victims. andrew harding reports. >> rape survivors in a region overwhelmed by sexual violence. go --s latest -- kong congo's latest survivors. it was an apparently orchestrated campaign. >> they were attacked by a group of men, between two and six people typically. they were physically beaten and then sexually assaulted, often in front of family members and children. >> but could it have been stopped? the united nations runs the world's biggest peacekeeping operation here. troops were in the area. their base was 20 miles away. access and communications are often difficult, but on at this occasion, the u.n. admits it should have done more. >> the primary responsibility for the protection of civilians lies with the states. clearly, we have also failed. our actions were not adequate, resulting in an acceptable brutalization of the population of women and children. -- in unacceptable brutalization of the population of women and children. we must do better. >> but doing so will not be easy. the u.n. has 20,000 pe
, and an explanation of the role the u.n. has. let's take a look at some of the other headlines. president obama hopes of persuading an increasingly skeptical public that he is on top of america's economic troubles have suffered another setback. his top adviser on the economy, larry summers, has announced he will leave the white house at the end of the year. it is all happening with the economy if the center stage in the run-up to the midterm congressional elections. >> no one ever accused larry summers of lacking confidence. i first met him in the 1990's here at the world economic forum in davos. he was part of the clinton administration. the united states troubled economy has proven resistant to his efforts. to many americans, it does not feel like the recession has ended. he was seen as one of the main architects of president obama's economic policy. now he will be returning to his academic career at harvard university. in a statement, president obama said he would grateful that he was willing to leave the economic team. the departure of larry summers does look like a blow for the president. he is
, iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad dropped his bomb at the u.n. most people, he claimed believe american officials staged 9/11. >> translator: that some segments within the u.s. government orchestrated the attack to reverse the declining american economy and its grips on the middle east in order to save the zionist regime. >> reporter: u.s. diplomats and other delegations walked out citing his vial conspiracy theories. rudy giuliani called ahmadinejad insane or giving a great imitation. iran, giuliani said, must not get nuclear weapons. that was president obama's obama meeting with china's premier who is helping to pressure iran. but his main focus here at the u.n. was an arab/israeli peace deal completed by this time next year. >> if we can have an agreement that will lead to a new member of the united nations, independent, sovereign state of palestine livie ing in peace wi israel. >>> there's a lot of talk point education and the u.s. falling behind their counterparts. we will begin a special topic called "education nation" and michelle franzen brings us a report on how teache
system which have proved to be rather embarrassing. >> you are watching "bbc world news." the u.n. warns of potential on rest of the price of grain and shoots up. -- if the price of grain shoots up. japan has released the captain a chinese fishing boat who was detained in a fishing waters. >> japanese prosecutors have been questioning the fishing boat captain for two weeks. in the end, they decided to let him go in the national interest. >> after taking into consideration the effect that it would have upon our country and people as well as how it would affect japan-china relations, we decided it was not appropriate to continue holding the suspect. >> early this month, the chinese fishermen was brought to japan in handcuffs and his face was hidden from view. is the tension caused the deepest rift between the two biggest economies. the japanese coast guard ships have been left dented by a collision with the boat. the suspicion was that he did this deliberately. it happened as they patrolled disputed waters near the island's patroled by japan trained by china. on the arrest triggered protes
is not yet calculated. >> still to come on a gmt, a new term as president -- the u.n. report blames the army for widespread atrocities. france is standing firm on its security despite weekend protests concerning the roma migrants. there will be meeting in paris and attended by ministers from european countries, canada, and the u.s. -- not people in romania are voicing their outrage at the expulsion. this concerns some delays send back from france. >> he did not have the luxury of a horse and the fans, but for six years he had a steady income, gathering scrap metal on a hand-held court. the french police gave him a bleak choice -- leave or be expelled. now he is determined to return. many expelled from france come from villages like this one on the far western edge of romania. for years, france has represented a lifeline for the poorest of the poor, and that is not one they're willing to relinquish easily. the party has deep roots. many here cannot read or write, and some have no identity papers are proof that they own homes or land. one unexpected consequence of the deportations has been to
protests. >> mahmoud ahmadinejad will address the u.n. general assembly thursday. >>> the u.n. is asking world leaders to send more financial relief aid to pakistan. the plea comes two days after the u.n. made the largest disaster appeal ever asking the world governments to raise $2 billion for flood victims. some countries say they will provide relief if the pakistani government can account for every dollar spent. >>> investors hope to continue riding the rising value of the stock market and bad weather isn't enough to keep away crowds overseas looking to buy an ipad. >>> time for the first living smart report of the morning. >> reporter: this week brings the housing market into focus. reports are due on sales of both new homes and previously owned ones. we will hear the latest on construction of new residential buildings. the financial markets watch the reports closely for signals on the outlook for the construction industry. turbulence in the stock industry put another dent in the nest eggs. losses in stock portfolios caused the most damage. before last quarters decline america's neat
they plan to arrest a trader on suspicion of illegally exporting pianos to north korea in defiance of u.n. anti-nuclear sanctions. police say they have obtained an arrest warrant for the president of hiroshima-based trading house saprider trading on suspicion of illegally shipping 22 pianos from a port in kobe to north korea via dalian, china in 2008. pianos are on a no shipping list as part of the u.n. sanctions imposed on north korea following its nuclear test in 2006. the list includes luxury goods as well as machines alterable to weapons of mass destruction. in june of last year the japanese government imposed a unilateral sanction against the north by banning the shipment of all the items on the u.n. list. police say the company allegedly shipped pianos after the government made such exports illegal. they say they will arrest the trader on thursday after gathering enough evidence during a search on the company in april. >>> north korea has not yet confirmed the opening of a historic meeting of its ruling workers' party despite an earlier announcement that the event would be held. the
's hindus river may be flowing, but not international aid. the u.n. appeals for more money. hello, it is the first state visit by a pope to britain since the 16th century when henry viii broke from rome and formed the anglican church. the pope has been forced to acknowledge failings over pedophile priests and issued a warning about the dangers of what he calls aggressive secularism in britain. we look at an occasion that matches protocol with religious fervor. >> it was as the pope's aircraft brought him to edinburgh that he talked about the sex abuse scandal. he said the catholic church hadn't dealt with the problem decisive enough. these revelations were for me a shock and great sadness, he said. this is a time of penitence. the first priority is taking care of the victims. that's probably all the pope will say about the matter. the man greeted by the duke of edinburgh is a rather shy and scholarly man. the duke escorted the pope through military honor. absent from the cardinals traveling with the pope, his friend, cardinal casper, whose comparison of the u.k. to a third world n
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,005 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)